Top College News Subscribe to the Newsletter

State of the Union address a bevy of optimistic promises

Published: Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Updated: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 01:02

President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address on Tuesday, laying out his plans and perspectives for the future of the country.

From the looming sequestration and debt reduction to the importance of continued investments in education, Obama portrayed a demeanor that suggested the nation has been improving in recent years and will move forward.

But one point Obama made stood out — bipartisan
arguing is a hindrance in the way of America’s growth. Quoting John F. Kennedy, he said, “The constitution makes us not rivals for power but partners for progress.”

As he addressed the issues the country faces, it was clear it was in no way indicative of what will actually pass through a politically-charged, divisive legislature.

The looming sequestration and the debate over plans to reduce the deficit have been pushed off for far too long, and the never-ending debate just leads to further disputes and gridlock over the tax code.

Though Obama announced that to see growth of the middle class “citizens must have access to the education and training that today’s jobs require,” it is likely that everything except defense will see budget cuts, when no one can agree on a deficit plan.

On the issue of immigration, Obama said, “leaders from the business, labor, law enforcement and faith communities all agree that the time has come to pass comprehensive immigration reform.”

He may actually be on to something, as Republican
lawmakers are trying to change public perception of their party when it comes to immigration so they can
better attract Latinos to vote for them.  
 

Of all of the hope-inspiring rhetoric that Obama uttered to the nation on Tuesday one thing stood out even more.


“The American people don’t expect government to solve every problem,” Obama said. “They don’t expect those of us in this chamber to agree on every issue. But they do expect us to put the nation’s interests before party.”

It is true we expect the government to put the nation’s interests before party, but — if the last session of congress was any indicator — we also know that it would be foolish to expect that it will be done.

 

Recommended: Articles that may interest you

Be the first to comment on this article!





log out